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Siblings, Gratitude and Aging Parents – AARP

Siblings, Gratitude and Aging Parents – AARP.

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~ by Butch on February 1, 2014.

2 Responses to “Siblings, Gratitude and Aging Parents – AARP”

  1. Reblogged this on Dealing with Dementia and commented:
    If you share caregiving duties, you will find this interesting. The gratitude you share is linked to general satisfaction of shared caregiving roles it seems. I am fortunate.

    I previously wrote about how my siblings and I divvied up the duties. We have ground rules and have calls at least once a month. There are 4 of us. Truly Blessed.

    My priori posts on this topic:
    http://dealingwithdementia.wordpress.com/2013/08/26/the-care-giving-roles-and-working-with-siblings/

    http://dealingwithdementia.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/finding-our-roles-as-siblings-and-care-givers/

  2. Reblogged this on Going Gentle Into That Good Night and commented:
    Unfortunately, more times than not, siblings do not share equal responsibility for caregiving for our parents with dementias and Alzheimer’s Disease. Sometimes it’s a simple matter of physical distance: they want to help, but they are too far away. However, that is not the norm. Parent-child relationships are complicated from the get-go and each child makes a conscious decision whether to maintain a close relationship or not as an adult (usually as soon as he or she leaves home). These are heart decisions.

    For siblings, much of whatever the tenor of their relationships were growing up extends into their relationships as adults. However, one of the complicating factors is real and imagined grudges and resentments (known or unknown) by siblings, often from perceived wrongs that occurred all along the way of their lives, that are nurtured and grow into full-blown anger and disconnection.

    It happens more than it doesn’t, but if caregivers find themselves in the rare position of having supportive and engaged and grateful siblings, then they should count our blessings. Because this is, sadly, not the norm.

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